Skip to main content

About your Search

20131101
20131130
SHOW
News 22
( more )
STATION
CSPAN 51
MSNBCW 41
CSPAN2 33
CNNW 25
ALJAZAM 23
MSNBC 16
KGO (ABC) 12
CNBC 10
FBC 7
CSPAN3 2
KNTV (NBC) 2
KOFY 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
WMPT (PBS) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 274
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 274 (some duplicates have been removed)
to organize a petition drive. they did try to get the repeal of massachusetts health reform on to the ballot for a statewide vote. and it works in massachusetts like it does in every state. you need to get your ballot language approved by the state, then you need to get a certain number of signatures, but if you clear that number of signatures and it turns out enough of those signatures are real people, then your repeal thing goes on the ballot and people get to vote on whether or not to repeal that law. the repeal romney care folks never got to the end of that process, because they got distracted. see, the whole effort to repeal health reform in massachusetts seems to have actually been kind of a pet project, maybe a side interest, for one single anti-abortion group in that state. and even though the group said they really wanted to repeal romney care and they got the repeal romney care url and they got the website up and everything, they ended up losing interest. i think, because massachusetts decided that they were going to consider a doctor-assisted suicide measure, and that excited the
for massachusetts. we will also take your calls, e- mails and tweets. andy look at today's news. and a look at today's news. ♪ >> good morning, it is the "washington journal" for november 19. president obama will meet with the select senate legionnair les today. several stories in the paper talk about the status of those discussions. president obama will also sit down for an hour long interview with wall street journals gerald side. that at c-span.org. it is the 150th anniversary of the gettysburg address. government of the people by the people and for the people that shall not perish from the earth. on this anniversary we want to get your thoughts not only on the speeches that were told that end, but what it means for our country today. here's how you can do so -- >> if you want to give us your thoughts on the gettysburg address via twitter you can do so. as always, you can e-mail us at span.org. >> i hear some of the speech that was delivered back on november 19, 1863. it is by president lincoln. it is rather frustrated dedicated to the great task remaining before us that we take increased devot
to and even then at the very last minute. under romney-care in massachusetts, in many ways, this was the template of the affordable care act. this is where things stood after one month, 123 people have seened up. granted, it is one state, there are 34 states using the federal obama care website. that's about one-third of 1%. after otwo months in massachusetts, just 2,300 people have enrolled. it was only after 11 months under the threat of a penalty about to be imposed that more than 36,000 people in massachusetts would go on to enroll. most of them didn't enroll until that 11-month mark. so obama care can work. it won't kick in until the end of next march, five months from now. getting it to work depends on getting the problems ironed out and getting americans of all ages signed up. the obama administration needs to straighten out the political mess it's created. it's not just one future cabinet secretary at stake. this is the fate of the democratic party and beyond it is tied to whether obama care succeeds. the short term, that means getting the website fixed. in the long
the slavery and women's rights before the massachusetts state legislature. coming up, event honoring this early feminist including a panel looking at women in politics. from boston, this is just over two hours. ♪ [applause] >> welcome, everyone. i will be your evening moderator. we are here tonight to explore how women become political. we will look at the past in the present and consider the future, too. there will be some remarks and a panel. regretfully, senator elizabeth warren is not able to join us because she needs to be in washington. someone has to work. she is there to work in the senate. [applause] however, she has made a short video for us that we will share in place of the remarks she would have given. now, during the evening we invite you to tweet and send your questions at #womenpoli2013. also a reminder. silence your cell phones right now. everybody moving to silence the cell phones? good. and for those who could not attend tonight, the good news is that the event is being taped by the grimke event committee for viewing the event at the website and by c-span for vie
of the open enrollment period 106,000 or 1.4% of consumers are going to sign up. if you look at massachusetts, during its first month -- and, mr. president, i'm sure you're aware of this, being in new jersey, close to massachusetts, only 0.3%, or 123 people signed up for coverage out of the 36er,000 who ultimately signed up in the first year. so let's be clear. we all wanted to see bigger numbers, but the affordable care act numbers are four times better than what massachusetts did in its first month. if you talk to the people of massachusetts, they love their health care plan. and our plan is based on their plan. by the way, a republican plan. hundreds of thousands have started the enrollment proficiency and i'll onprocess,. i'm going to go shopping and buy my plafnlt but i'm taking my time because i have some time -- until december. i am going to discuss it with my husband. we're going to decide what's best for us. i'm going to sign up. you know, i think it was the secretary sebelius who said, this isn't like buying a toaster. this is a commitment for a year, and you've got to take your tim
from massachusetts, ms. tsongas. ms. tsongas: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: without objection the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. shuster is recognized for one minute. mr. shuster: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to introduce a good friend and community leader in my home state, reverend paul taylor and thank him for offering today's invocation. he made the trip to the nation's capital from the city of letreau, pennsylvania. for the past 17 years, reverend taylor has dedicated his life to the students and faculty at st. vincent's college. he's held several positions there, dean of admissions, dean of students and executive vice president. his civic engagement and enthusiasm for improving the lives of o's is not limited to higher education he also serves on the board to have directors for the hospital charity foundation. in his personal life he's an avid hunter and served as super to the six-time bowl champio
in 1838 that angelina grimke was speaking to the massachusetts state legislature, against slavery and for a woman's right to vote, only a mile away in the north end, john simmons was actively growing his tailoring business, employing many women here in boston and in the countryside around the city. having observed that most of his customers fell into standard sizes, he departed from custom tailoring and innovated the retail industry by creating a man's off the rack suit. at the end of the civil war, john simmons had become the largest clothing manufacturer in the united states. at the time of his death in 1870, his will records his intention for his great wealth. to found and endow an institution to be called simmons female college for the purpose of teaching branches of art, science, and industry, this calculated to enable the scholars to acquire an independent likelihood. recognizing the importance of being able to move beyond the menial work and menial wages to which most women of the day were hasect, john simmons enabled generations and him and to be empowered. those of us who
body. she spoke before the masses uses state legislator -- the massachusetts state legislature. coming up, this is just over two hours. [applause] >> welcome, everyone. moderatoryour evening . we are here tonight to explore how women become political. we will look at the past and the future,and consider the too. there will be some remarks and the panel of discussion you'd regretfully, senator elizabeth warren is not able to join us because she needs to be in washington. someone has to work. she is there to work in the senate. [applause] has made a short video for us that we will share place of the remarks she would have given. during the evening, we invite you to tweak and send your questions in via twitter at -- to tweet and send your questions in via twitter at #womenpoli2013. also, silence your cell phones right now. everybody moving to silence the cell phones? good. and for those who could not attend tonight, the good news is that the event is being taped by the grimke event committee for anding via the website by c-span for viewing later on this fall. this event has come together
accused of killing a popular teacher in massachusetts is also charged with raping her now. we are learning a lot more from documents that the court has now released today. police say they found a note alongside this young teacher's body. we'll tell you what it said. you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed much is the official retirement age. ♪ the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years. ♪ >> virginia state senator creigh deeds left the hospital three days after surviving a stabbing a parentally at the hands o of his son, and soon after he left the hospital he tweeted, i am alive so i must live. some wounds won't heal. your prayers and friendship are important to me. on tuesday, investigators say senator deeds got into some sort of altercation with his 24-year-old son, gus deeds. police say the son apparently stabbed his father several times and then s
, the first woman senator from massachusetts in the u.s. senate. let's have a little applause right there. [applause] in addition, we have a number of other important female elected officials some of whom are with us tonight. we're honored to have present as well, steve grossman, treasurer of the commonwealth. and would other male elected officials stand who are here tonight in support of the cause of women in politics? [applause] tonight's event was sparked by a milestone in women's political activism 175 years ago right here in boston. angelina grimke, a white southerner from charleston, south carolina, became the first american woman to address the legislative body. tonight, we are honored to have her great-great-grandson with us. please give him applause. [applause] angelina grimke's purpose in addressing the legislative body was to present petitions bearing the signatures of 20,000 massachusetts women, black and white, to a joint committee of the general court. the petitioners sought to have congress end slavery in the district of columbia. before grimke spoke about the issue of slav
officers. and almost immediately the governor of massachusetts began recruiting free blacks. fly were distributed near and far from massachusetts to connecticut and pennsylvania, ohio, other northern states and even to canada. working to fill a first of 1,000 recruiters included prominent black frederick douglass and william henry johnson. the 45th massachusetts volunteer was the first northern black to be organized and among the recruit were two of frederick douglass' sons. the white officers were hand picked by the governor himself. subsequently, 23-year-old robert shaw became the chosen officer to lead the regular men had such great importance first because unlike the other black regularmen already organized in the south, it was composed of free black men. would rest on the conduct of the 45th massachusetts battle when the nay sayers were insisting blacks would not, could not fight. having no clue about the fire in their soul ready to ignite. frederick douglass. the 54th massachusetts four performed valiantly. they. they were honor recipient served. it was sergeant william consider
that because we know the product is good. senator boxer talked about the massachusetts experience in which during the first month of their enrollment for the massachusetts exchange, only .3 #% of the total signed up during that month. why? because people take time. this is not animal easy decision to sign up for health care. in connecticut where we have an exchang that's up and running, a wbsz thabs working, the first month, know our number? it was not.# # #%, but enrolled 10% of the expected total in the first 30 days, and here's what people say about their experience with connecticut's exchange. one said, this is a great resource for cops residents to apply for health coverage, thanks to the health care law. another said, i chose access health because i've been denied in the past by other carriers. before this law changed. another said, thank you so much for this health care law. i have not been insured in a decade. i am so, so, so thankful. another said, thank you for this program. i lost my job a year ago and couldn't find anything that i could afford in health coverage before this law
. >> raising kids. >>> a massachusetts woman on a noigs protect our four legged friends. her campaign to keep the k-9 officers safe and sound. >>> a dog, a blind man and a flight attendant and the passenger revolt they triggered that actually kept the flight on the ground. that story is coming up on "world news now." >> announcer: "world news >>> we all know heros come in different shapes and sizes, and often four feet. >> one animal lover in massachusetts is trying to change it one dog at a time. here's abc's gio benitez. >> they are heros on the front line, the first on the scene. the most dangerous confrontations. >> saint paul police k-9 is dead. >> the k-9 officer. >> shot and killed the dog. >> just last month t k-9 from sacramento county shot in the chest while chasing a robbery suspect. he survived. it's a headline that officer ed meyers hears all too often. >> my partner looks out for me. i look out for my partner. >> reporter: partners that do their job without a crucial life-saving tool, a bulletproof vest. that's where sandy mar sell comes in. custom-fitted k-9 vests cost $950. to
different ways from different parts of the british isles so you had puritan massachusetts, anglican virginia, maryland founded by catholic family, quaker pennsylvania, dutch reform new york. the framers of the constitution understood this when they decreed there would be no religious test for federal office and the authors of the bill of rights understood when they said congress shall make no law regarding an establishment of religion which meant there would be no national religion but it also meant among other things that states could maintain their established churches, the commonwealth of massachusetts maintained an established church until 1843. americans have learned from early times not only to polk but even prosper as a nation with cultural diversity but that diversity has also led to severe strains and in one case to a seemingly irrepressible conflict. the first was the mass movement of the scotch irish from northern ireland and lowland scotland in a dozen years before the american revolution. they started coming over in some numbers in 1713 but there was a real rush, a real surge af
speakers, and senators -- the gentlelady from massachusetts and washington state. i ask unanimous consent morning business be extended for these two for approximately ten minutes. the presiding officer: is there objection? seeing no objection, the request is granted. ms. mikulski: i now yield to the gentlelady from washington state and then massachusetts. the presiding officer: the gentlelady from washington. mrs. murray: first i want to thank the senator from maryland and the senator from maine for helping to bring so many of us to the floor today to talk about an issue that really cuts across bipartisan -- cuts across partisan lines and has plagued our nation's military and has gone unaddressed for far too long. military sexual assault is an epidemic, and it is right -- it has rightly been identified as such by the pentagon. it is absolutely unconscionable that a fellow service member, the person you rely on to have your back and to be there for you would commit such a terrible crime. it is simply appalling that they could commit such a personal violation of their brother or sister in u
. >> i think that massachusetts is always pointed to as the model and advancement. what most people don't understand is that massachusetts modifies insurance market over a 20 year period and going to the individual mandate was the last stuff in a long process that includes the health insurance market substantially. what we did was cram all that into is very short. mcintyre. neil: okay, the argument of massachusetts showing that things were not rammed down people's throats. now republicans are going to seize up this and say, okay, we want to refute us. >> welcome i think it would be great if we could see some bipartisan collaboration. and i hope that we can find a way through it. at the end o the day we have millions of cancellation notices and the people are worried and we need to get access to care. neil: thank you so much. meanwhile, we have a stunning admission. >> chronically the federal programs are over budget and behind schedule and, you know, we might have done more to make sure that we are breaking the mold and how we are going to set this up. but that doesn't help us now. we w
the fox news deck. >> watching three developing stories right now. first, massachusetts, four people found dead in one home two adults and two little kids. we're expecting new information in a news conference from police at any minute. we'll have it for you. george zimmerman arrested again. there's the new mug shot. we're waiting for the 9-1-1 call. >>> and a live look at a scene in toronto, where -- well, it will be, anyway -- where the city council is moving to strip the crack-smoking mayor of more of his power. >>> his fox news interview. >> i admitted to using illegal drugs in the last year. okay. i've admitted to drinking too much. okay. >> and there's much more to come from north america's mayor. so let's get too -- let's get to it. >> first from the news deck at 3:00 in new york city, hundreds of families are searching through piles of debris to find what remains of their homes and their lives. weather officials say more than 40 twisters tore across a wide stretch of the midwest over the weekend, bulldozing house after house, and littering entire town with debris. most people scramm
, for example, noted that in the first month of sign-ups for the massachusetts version of health reform, only 100 people signed none the whole first month. but in massachusetts, eventually the glitches got ironed out, and enrollment numbers went up. and now in massachusetts, there is essentially universal coverage. that state is essentially the template for our national numbers. but the numbers out today, 100,000 people signed up in the first month. in addition, another one million people were determined to be eligible for getting a new play in marketplaces for health insurance. but they have not chosen a plan yet. the overall idea is for everybody to get insurance over time. the republicans are rejoicing in the early low numbers, praying nobody else signs up to get health insurance, but we'll see how it goes. history tells us these things do tend to start slowly. also in washington today, you just heard on "all in" with chris hayes, they also saw the introduction of a landmark new piece of federal legislation that would try to protect women's access to abortion, protecting it, not curtailing
that brought the fbi to a small town. >>> but first, chilling new details in the murder of a massachusetts teacher next. vo: it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare >>> there was a note found next to the body. philip chism has been arrested for murder, rape, armed robbery. he will be arraigned december 4th. >>> an eighth student at princeton university is being treated for meningitis. investigators are test to go see if she has the same rare bacterial strain found in seven other cases at the school. princeton officials plan to provide students with a vaccine. it has been approved in europe, not the u.s. >>> people signing up for obama care will have more time to do so. obama administration is extending deadline by one week, giving americans until december 23rd to si
, that in the first couple of months in massachusetts, and that's really the only precedent we had, there were only a couple of thousand people who signed up. we also know about the very troubled rollout of the prescription drug site. we do know that fixes could be made. one thing we also know is that if you put a bill on the floor, and that's what i challenge speaker boehner to do, put a bill on the floor to fix it and see if that doesn't devolve into another appeal. remember where they began. first they undermined it. then they tried to repeal it. now they're trying to sabotage it. one of the problems we're having now is that they're having to take money from other parts of hhs because the appropriators have not in fact funded what needed to be done with this site. one of the changes i think that's going to have to happen is that the public is not going to action i believe, be forced to pay a fine if the website isn't up and if the whole thing isn't running more smoothly. i don't think anybody wants to put this over on the public. but nobody for one second believes that my committee, which is now
on "meet the press." he talked about how the federal law differs from the one he enacted in massachusetts when he was governor and the potential impact he thinks the problems could have on the rest of president obama's term. state should be able through the laboratory of democracy model to put in place the plan that works best for them and if they adopt the massachusetts plan, terrific. if they adopt a different plan, that's fine. recognize that massachusetts teaches some important lessons some states are not going to follow. one lesson is health insurance is more expensive in massachusetts than anywhere else in the country. montana is notng necessarily going to want to adopt. you will see as a result of obamacare premiums going up dramatically across the country and going back to the key thing the president is trying to get away from is he told people they could keep their insurance and that was not the truth. whether you like the model of obamacare or not, the fact the president sold on a basis that was not true has undermined the second term. i think it is rotting it away and the only
of this irresponsibility and the negligence of this company in massachusetts. a lawsuit was filed recently in nevada. two young boys were allegedly impacted significantly as a result of this medication that was really bad medication. unless the entire united states senate bends to that one senator's wish -- the one that voted "no" -- he will force this body to jump through hoops and work through the next several days wasting time to finish this crucial drug safety bill. but we're going to finish the bill. we're going to finish that bill. it's important for our country, and i can't let one senator dictate what goes on here in the senate. mr. president, following leader remarks, the senate will be in a period of morning business for two hours. republicans will control the first half, and the majority will control the final half. following that morning business, we will vote on the adoption of the motion to proceed to h.r. 3204, the pharmaceutical drug compounding bill. this is expected to -- i hope that in fact is the case. if thats case that is the case,e will said to what will happen subsequent to thasm
at this massachusetts sheriff's office where six canines train every day, jumping through hurdles wearing those vests. donations have poured in big and small. recently 10-year-old allison henry donated her birthday money, enough to vest her local canine officer, ryker. so far no canine has been turned away. in fact, more than 450 dogs have gotten that body armor in 37 states. officer meyer's dog barrage will get his in just weeks. >> what is it about a canine? >> i think i see the bond when i look at each of these officers with their dog and i feel like i'm doing what i'm meant to do. >> reporter: committing to her passion to protect canines and that's what makes her america strong. gio benitez, abc news, bristol county, massachusetts. >> it was great to have you with us tonight. we're always here at abcnews.com with the latest, "nightline" as well and we'll see you again tomorrow. >>> breaking news, there could be another bart strike in the future. >>> and a video that shows what happened to a transgender teenager. >>> support for a ac transit rider burned on the bus the surprising outlook of the pa
, massachusetts. theoretically, it is a great idea that people should talk politics all the time. the problem is that the nation is divided. they cannot have civil discourse. some programs on c- span, national security issues, people discussing this pointed out that our politicians are unable to discuss certain issues, so how to use -- how do you expect civilians to do so? host: have you have holidays ruined because of political discussions? caller: they can just add to the fuel. roy, from is massachusetts. page, on our facebook most of them saying no. 63 are saying thanksgiving is not time to talk politics. one of the ways you can talk to us about if thanksgiving is a time to talk about politics and how that goes for you, @cspanwj is our twitter address, facebook.com/cspan is our facebook page and journal@c- span.org is our e-mail. taylor, elkton, maryland, democrats line. taylor? caller: good morning. i think it is a great time. one of the things i am most thankful for is growing up with a republican mother and a democrat father. every meal is a political -- meal with is a discussions about
and mass dashes massachusetts they have the day off. blue laws still rule ins those three states where shopping is prohibited today. i guess they'll just have to enjoy thanksgiving. bummer. >>> well four people busted using a drone to speak stuff -- sneak stuff into a jail. plus, stun guns for a police cars? and a father/son team talking turkey in south alabama. here's kenneth white sr. and kenneth wise jr. take a listen. [ bells dinging ] ♪ hark how the bells, sweet silver bells ♪ ♪ all seem to say throw care away ♪ ♪ from everywhere, filling the air ♪ [ female announcer ] chex party mix. easy 15-minute homemade recipes you just pop in a microwave. like caramel chocolate drizzles. happier holidays. chex party mix. ♪ [ male announcer ] 1.21 gigawatts. today, that's easy. ge is revolutionizing power. supercharging turbines with advanced hardware and innovative software. using data predictively to help power entire cities. so the turbines of today... will power us all... into the future. ♪ [ mom ] be right there, baby. [ muffled noises ] oops. ow. sorry. [ baby crying ]
in massachusetts came up with a new mash up word for today. thanksgivukkah. experts say based on the current greg or yan and jewish calend s calendars, they won't fall on the same day again for more than $70,000 years. >> pretty impressive. >>> the macy's thanksgiving day parade made its way through the streets of new york city today. the big balloons were allowed to fly, but had to stay close to the ground. this year, they were five feet lower than normal. even then, sudden gusts made the balloons hard to control. the parade started back in 1924 with animals from the central park zoo. it was such a success, organizers decided to make it an annual event. >> and in north dakota, a couple of hunters captured this scene. a phenomenon near the town of leonard. it's a nearly perfect circle of spinning ice. experts say they have seen similar patterns in river when it begins to ice up, but unusual for one to be so round. some are calling it mother nature's work of art. >> still ahead, heartwarming story that puts the giving in thanksgiving. >> surprise one mom got when to those who've encountered welco
about the open moment period look at massachusetts and mr. president, i am sure you are aware of this being in new jersey coast of massachusetts only 0.2% sign up for coverage and out of the 36,000 who ultimately signed up in the first year. so let's be clear that we wanted to see bigger numbers of informal care act is four times better than what massachusetts did in its first month if you talk to people in massachusetts, they love the her health care plan and this is place content based on a republican plant. and i'm going to go shopping and buy a new plan. i'm taking my time because i have time and want to discuss it with my husband. i'm going to sign up and i think it was the secretary that said that is not like buying a toaster. and you have to take your time. and so don't do that without having to put anything in place and focus on the problem that the president said he needs to fix. i want to play the great news about california. just in the first few weeks, enrollment has doubled. and our story is a really g
, massachusetts. caller: good morning. i was born on march 21, 1960, so at the time i would have been a little over three and a half years old. i always remember, my first congress in memory that i ever had was being in the kitchen of our third-floor apartment and my mother crying. i remember asking her, you know, what was wrong, why was she crying, and she came out and said that it bad man or someone had shot the president. to this day i would give a million dollars to remember the questions i am sure i probably asked her as any three and a half-year-old would. she was a strong woman and really did not cry that often, but i remember to this day her crying and that really affected her like i guess they did the rest of the nation. every time i hear of the assassination, i always think that that was the first thing that i really remember happening in my life, my mother, how hard she took it that day. that is all i have to say. thank you. host: thank you for the call. i want to go back to one of the iconic photographs, november 22, the open air motorcade with the president and first lady. in fron
leader in the senate having lost his 60th vote in a special election in massachusetts that year, felt he could not pass anything. he could not achieve cloture with only 59 democrats to vote in favor of that motion for cloture. that's the reason why not one word was changed between christmas eve 2009 and the time this bill was actually passed. but if h.r. 3590, after it came back from the senate, came to the rules committee, did it come to the house under an open rule? no, it did no. it was a closed rule. we were kept out. process. it's hard to it -- kept house of the process. it's hard to -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. burgess: when a bill of this magnitude came with so little debate, so little input from the minority, yeah, we got a one-page bill before the house today. this was a 2,700-page bill that affected every man, woman, and child in this country, not just today, not just tomorrow, but for the next three decades they'll be living under this and it came under a closed rule. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reser
, massachusetts, for democrats. you are on with trita parsi. i agree with the caller earlier who was saying why is netanyahu screaming about orion -- iran having nuclear weapons? for them to have that to have energy throughout their country and it creates jobs for their country. think we need to put israel in check. it seems like they are trying to take focus off of what they are doing in their country. they are taking all of the land andans' dividing that country. -- he feels pity because they are treating me palestinian people the same way at germany treated the israeli people. host: do think that is a fair assessment? guest: i would say that because the iranians are -- of the mpt. the and national -- the international community is -- i don'tthe fact think they need a nuclear weapons. nuclear and causes a nuclear domino effect in the middle east, then you have other countries starting nuclear weapons programs. that would eliminate a conventional superiority that iran has. it would eight p.m. -- it would -- mistake for them to host: an e-mail that we received on the subject. in what hetes doe
of cultural and ethnic equality broad different parts of the british isles. so you have spirited massachusetts coming anglican and virginia virginia, maryland founded by a catholic family in quaker pa., a dutch reformed york. the framers of the constitution understood this when they decreed no test for federal office and the bill of rights understood when they said congress shall make no law to establish a religion that meant no national religion but it also meant thate states could maintain their established church as the commonwealth of massachusetts and as it remained until 18303. americans have learned toe not only toa cope but prosperulu as a nation of cultural diversity but that has led to severe strains ended one case the irrepressible conflict. the first is the mass movement of lee scott irish before the american revolution they started to come over and some members in 1730 but there is a real surge after the seven years' war from the war of 1763 like earlier colonial settlers they did not come because of a mixture of religious or political reasons and so were coercion like white inden
helped write the massachusetts health care law. professor gruber, this number, the 1.5% is what we've been wondering about since we first started hearing the stories about policy cancellations and people having to get new insurance and what we wanted to know is how many of these people will actually end up paying more? some estimates said maybe 5% but it turns out to be something very low. >> well, the main point, lawrence, is that most americans are simply not affected. most americans get their health insurance from their employer, the government are not affected. it's the roughly 4% of americans who buy health insurance on their own who could potentially see higher prices and of that, only about a third or about 1.5% of people actually end up paying more for their health insurance under this law. >> i want to put up a graph that indicates exactly what you said, i think one of our numbers in it might be slightly off but we have a graph showing that 80%, 80% are unaffected by the affordable care act in terms of their costs, 15% are the, are uninsured who will get health insurance t
. >>> it's the drug scandal that rocked the massachusetts justice system. a chemist mishandled sensitive evidence that was affecting thousands of state criminal cases going back a decade. we'll have that next number hey, i notice your car yeah. it's in the shop. it's going to cost me an arm and a leg. you shoulda taken it to midas. they tell you what stuff needs fixing, and what stuff can wait. high-five! arg! brakes, tires, oil, everything. (whistling) you really love, what would you do?" ♪ [ woman ] i'd be a writer. [ man ] i'd be a baker. [ woman ] i wanna be a pie maker. [ man ] i wanna be a pilot. [ woman ] i'd be an architect. what if i told you someone could pay you and what if that person were you? ♪ when you think about it, isn't that what retirement should be, paying ourselves to do what we love? ♪ >>> if you haven't heard this story, it is staggering in what the impact what may be. a former mches state chemist is on her way to prison for faking test results. she pleaded guilty to 27 counts yesterday including tampering with evidence, perjury, obstruction of justice and f
in massachusetts. it uses ideas out of the heritage foundation. the individual mandate was originated in the heritage foundation in 1989. the republicans introduced a similar legislation in 1992. you guys are complaining that this is a radical thing. it is filled with republican ideas and the other problem is, you guys have complained for four years and jumping up and down and complaining about how awful obamacare is. there is no republican alternative as far as i know. there is none that has been passed in the house. you don't have a comprehensive health care plan. the health care costs that we have in the united states have been rising and rising for the past 20 years. they are projected to continue to rise if there is no change. what is the republican alternative to the awful, harvell, terrible, ghastly obamacarec which is really romneyare? guest: i think it's true that in the 1990s, there were conservatives who were trying to be proactive and look for ways to solve the healthcare problem. it is wrong to say that all republicans embrace this idea and rally around it but there are
. if you look at when massachusetts rolled out the hethcare in 2007, the supposed data shows a lot of young adults came in at the last minute. weave a shoddy website. young adults are not going there. they are waiting. another point to be made. we saw the jobs report this week. have young adults looking for jobs. they're holding out on that option as ll. >> rich, there is another thing that young people are waiting for. having kids, i know how they work rick. rich, kids often will wait until they are forced to, until they are coerced to. and so far, they're waiting to see how much they can get away with, right? >> well, yeah. there's that. there is also the fact that the cultural ions, jon stewart are ochingly laughing at the program -- opingly laughing at the program. so you have technology that doesn't rk. this is a tech-savvy group of people. comedians on right and the left laughing at the program. and now you have number three, that obama broke his promises, said in 2009 and 2010. so, you kn, you have lack of trust going on here among young people. i will create actuarial death spiral.
in massachusetts, they put pictures like this on the wall. the loss to thieves nationally for supermarkets comes to $6 billion a year. the cost has to be made up somehow. >> if we aren't profitable we have to charge more for what we are selling. >> reporter: in many cases it is not the customers after the free stuffing, most of the theft that occurs at your grocery store happens right here at the checkout, at the hand of the employees. watch how this works. an overhead view of the cashier, items traveling past the bar code. see the red target. that is a turkey. what is happening right now, the cashier is suddenly jumping it around the scanner so it is not being rung up as a charge. although it is mixed in with other items that are. now, with the turkeys, some places really see a spike, as many as four times more turkeys heisted in november and december, than in the rest of the year combined. basically when you see that turkey being stolen, they have to sell 50 more turkeys to make up for the one that was given away for free. we asked maureen about what happens to the people who get caught? and w
jfk laid at rest at his home in massachusetts. paul fuqua was a part-time tour guide at arlington house. it sits atop a hill overlooking the cemetery. one day paul fuqua had an unexpected visitor. >> it was late afternoon early evening, and cars pulled up, and a gentlemen with head phones said the president is here. he said he and his friend were just driving around town looking at the city and looked up here, and he had never been here, so they thought they would come up here. and then we came out here and the city is incredible. >> the words kennedy spoke next would loom large. >> we paused a little bit longer, and he said this is so lovely, i could stay here forever. >> a friend with the president that day remembered those words. he told the family the story. soon paul fuqua has more vip visitors to scout it out. >> robert kennedy asked if that could be done? could that be a grave cite? and secretary mcnamara said yes, he could convert it to that use instantly. and so that was it. ♪ >> the day came. kings, queens, and leaders from around the world, joining the grieving widow,
economic growth. the state of massachusetts has generally been very well on this and basically massachusetts has imported high skilled, high education people. it's exported metal skill that is a relatively small state. you have got, what, six-point something million people in a little less than arizona. california has 38 million in texas has 25 million. so massachusetts is almost like a single nice metro area that's worked out pretty well. but you still have pretty high levels of any quality as well. so, you know, call on the people that say they want more inequality -- more income equality how come the places that you run have the highest income inequality. and they think the answer is you tax the middle income people out, you have high housing costs by environmental regulations and other things like california, for example but also, metro new york. no population increase in the last 40 years. it's the same. immigrants in and americans out. that's been the pattern. if you want to raise a family and you are not high income, phd educated, you have a decent job, what does the hou
to enact it will be popular as it is in massachusetts. >> you may be right but it's speculative. even if you -- even if you are right, doesn't it seem logical as i said in the talking points memo to just give it another year and iron it all out, explain it, i don't see a downside in that. i really don't. i would allow people who want to sign up to continue to sign up, all right? those who do the no give them a year fix what's broken it doesn't make me unhappy unlike other commentators it does not make me happy to see the president of the united states, no heart who he or she might be to be accused of being a liar. a rank liar that doesn't make me happy. i think we should get away from that. give it a year, it's our fault, we screwed it up. we will unscrew it and then we will go next september or whatever. doesn't that make sense to you, doc? >> two responses. one is the reason we can't delay it bill it comes to the most poor par part of the law. discriminate against insurer discriminate by charging sick more than healthy. you can't do that without the man date. you can't have the mand
as it is in massachusetts. >> you may be right but it's speculative. even if you -- even if you are right, doesn't it seem logical as i said in the talking points memo to just give it another year and iron it all out, explain it, i don't see a downside in that. i really don't. i would allow people who want to sign up to continue to sign up, all right? those who do the no give them a year fix what's broken it doesn't make me unhappy unlike other commentators it does not make me happy to see the president of the united states, no heart who he or she might be to be accused of being a liar. a rank liar that doesn't make me happy. i think we should get away from that. give it a year, it's our fault, we screwed it up. we will unscrew it and then we will go next september or whatever. doesn't that make sense to you, doc? >> two responses. one is the reason we can't delay it bill it comes to the most poor par part of the law. discriminate against insurer discriminate by charging sick more than healthy. you can't do that without the man date. you can't have the mandate without making insurance affordable. it all w
programs like medicare part d come and the massachusetts help reform that was obamacare's predecessor. most people tend to sign up for coverage closer deadlines, so that is what the administration hopes will vindicate them after the first month, which did not go well. host: but if the deadline is not until march, why were expectations so high to begin with? people do not have to sign up until later. guest: that is right here at march is a key deadline because it is obviously the end of a six-month enrollment period. the other date is december 15, which is when people choose plans if they want them to kick in in january. there are a lot of people losing their coverage right now and they're going to want to remain insured, and for them, the middle of december is the crucial deadline. the reason that that is tough for the administration is it comes only two weeks after the deadline, where they say they're going to have the website fix, which is the end of this month, so if they cannot have healthcare.gov up and running, functioning enough for millions of people to actually buy their health pla
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 274 (some duplicates have been removed)